Sunday, 3 March 2013

Truth is...

...Stranger than  Fiction.

This post has been published by me as a part of the Blog-a-Ton 37; the thirty-seventh edition of the online marathon of Bloggers; where we decide and we write. To be part of the next edition, visit and start following http://blogaton.in/">Blog-a-Ton
.
 The theme for the month is "Truth is stranger than fiction"




Hari was the 14th child to be born to his parents, after a gap of 11 years from the 13th. His father was on the verge of retirement when Hari made his appearance.  At the time when the second World war was just getting over, and the World was heaving a sigh of relief, a war in Hari's little World was brewing up, even before he was to be born. Almost the day he was conceived, his mother had started experiencing cold war from her husband, as though it was entirely her fault. In today's conditions, with the number of ways in vogue for avoiding pregnancies, Hari, and perhaps most of his siblings, would have never seen the light of the day.  But then things were different then, and Hari had to come to this World, and go through his share of suffering.

 Ever since Hari started understanding, he understood one thing very clearly, that his father was far from being pleased with his arrival in this, and his World.

His father was a medical doctor,  and for some reasons he had started believing that arrival of Hari was  ominously bad for him and his family. In fact, he was so insensitively vocal about it that he would call Hari, and introduce him to his friends, visitors and even strangers as 'a curse' thrust upon his family by the high Heavens. Little Hari was incapable of digesting such frequent insinuations.  But the dictatorial environment in his patriarchal south Indian home could provide no sympathy or succor to him. The unbearable, constant notes of rejection during his formative stages would drive Hari  on the brink of depression.  Only the warmth of his mother, and being good at studies saved him from succumbing to the thoughts of committing suicide.

However, as the teen years gave way to the adolescence, young Hari  developed the coping up skills with the adversities at home. But, he also started  realising that the frozen anger against his father, since the early childhood days, was slowly transforming into a deep rooted hatred for him. Every day added to his life, would add to the ill-feeling, repulsion against the now septuagenarian, frail old man. Hari was no longer a helpless child. He started dreaming to move out of the home, live in a hostel, and perhaps never to go back to the house which housed all the echoes of the invectives, and the ill-will that he was subjected to.

God heard his pleas, or so he thought, when his father agreed to his admission to the medical college, and there for, moving out to a hostel. Hari breathed some freedom. His blocked talents started surfacing, and soon he was a popular student. Home ward thoughts would cast a dark shadow at times, but he was determined to moving forward, and never look back.

Very soon Hari was part of the college milieu. His subtle humour and sharp mind won him many hearts, and he got elected to be the hostel prefect. Main job of prefects was to handle expenses of the hostel mess, and it was a tradition that at the end of their tenures the prefects would be seen in a new suit! However, Hari did not stitch a suit. On the contrary, he managed with lower per capita contributions of the students. This, very cleverly established him to be 'Mr. honest Prefect'. The inside story was different, though. Hari too had made some chunk of money, not enough for stitching a suit of course, but he did not show it off! In fact, he had learned the art of 'fleecing' money even from his father.   False and puffed up expenses were shown to get extra money which would go into buying dirty books and extravagance. Was it a kind of expression against his father? He did not know. The college life was going on smoothly, creating a niche for himself, and then something hit him. Life is not always smooth.

Hari got deeply influenced by the clarion call made by Gandhiji's grand son to join the group who would work to change the World. India was just getting into its 'teens' as a free nation, and had alredy started showing signs of corruption, discrimination, and the other ills. The call was to change the society. Hari found himself at the camp in the hills of Maharashtra. A high impact input given at the camp demanded of the men and women  to begin the process of change with themselves. Absolute Purity, Honesty, Unselfishness and Love (PHUL) were the standards given to examine their lives against, and jot down where all they had deviated. And then consciously go about putting them right. Simple to say, but difficult to put to practice. However, the motivation created was so strong that most of them returned the stolen library books, paid back the ticket less travel costs to the local bus services, and made up the broken relationships with friends and relations.

On his part, Hari,  with great difficulties of fighting the fear of losing his image of 'Mr Honest', managed to return the 150 Rupees he had made while managing the mess. He received rather positive reactions from one and all at the college. This boosted his confidence. And some heart touching positive stories from some of the camp mates about 're-making' their broken relationships further buoyed his courage and decided to re-make his relationship with his father.

Hari wrote a long letter to his father, expressing his angers, hatred, frustrations, feelings..etc about his father. He also confessed about extracting more money from home for his wrongful activities at college. He asked for forgiveness. He felt light. He got good sleep. He posted the letter to his father the next day.

He had only heard from his camp mates about great re-unions they had experienced. But now he was eagerly awaiting similar moment in his life. He literally started dreaming his father hugging him and warm trail of tears wetting their shoulders, and... Often he would be lost in his dreams. It gave him a huge boost of zest for life.

But, then, a few days passed and he did not realise that there was no response from his father so far. As the days turned into weeks, his enthusiasm turned into suspicion. Very reluctantly he called his uncle, and what he heard from him broke him down. It dawned on him how the truth was stranger than the fiction he was weaving in his mind.

It seems his father had become silent after reading the letter, and only after three days he spoke saying that so far he was only suspecting, but the letter confirmed that what ever he was thinking of his son had all come true. He declared that he was dis owning his son from that very moment onward.... 

Dilip

P.S.: The truth also is that Hari's father ultimately became very proud of Hari( strange, isn't it?) for what Hari achieved in his life following those 4 standards in life, Purity (of thoughts), Honesty, Unselfishness and Love.





The fellow Blog-a-Tonics who took part in this Blog-a-Ton and links to their respective posts can be checked http://www.blogaton.in/2013/03/blogaton37.html">here
. To be part of the next edition, visit and start following http://blogaton.in/">Blog-a-Ton. Introduced By: BLOGGER NAME, Participation Count: 04











20 comments:

  1. This was a moving story, even though it made me sad throughout.There are very few things more poignant that a child falling victim to the frustrations of her/his parents, through absolutely no fault of her/his own.

    I was hoping for a reconciliation at the end. Thankfully the PS gave me that satisfaction :)

    Very well-written!

    Besties for BAT!

    Mixi (My BAT entry)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks Mixi, truth indeed is stranger than fiction!

    ReplyDelete
  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  4. very moving, though provoking...i was seeing a different end
    but liked the climax :)
    ATB for BAT
    do drop in at:
    - Don't Whine

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Karan, the truth can not be concocted. I am glad you liked the climax.

      Delete
  5. very moving take. It is a dilemma that parenting, which is a tough task, and proper eligibility test ought to be in place before one can be father or mother. But we see hounds getting the title easily.
    Reminded me of an incident in train, A girl child was chirpy and drinking water from water bottle every now and then. with a bang she received a nice thundering slap from her mom.
    I was stunned. The child's father gave a timid inquiring look at her wife. Child was crying profusely. Her mother commented grudgingly, " itta paani pee rahi thi, baar baar bathroom kaun le ke jaayega train me".
    Brilliant take.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks very much, Rio for your kind words. This parenting angle is very relevant, and the example given by you is very apt.

      Delete
  6. Kids imbibe whatever comes their way , which inturn makes childhood the most tender period in a person's life . They need to be treated with love and care so that they would grow up to be responsible adults . You have contrived an extremely relevant story on the theme . Was indeed relieved to see a pleasant ending :)

    ReplyDelete
  7. The reality is indeed strange. There is always a great desire for happy ending, but I had to stick to the truth. The protagonist is today himself a grand father, and he had to keep up his faith in what he was doing so that a happy ending could come. It took years before his father changed his opinion. Since there was a big disconnect, I conveyed the happy ending only through post script, and not as continuum. Thanks for conveying your thoughts.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Moving story. It brought some real stories back from the memory. Life sometimes is indeed strange...

    ReplyDelete
  9. The End of Narration turned out to be different than anticipated- Interesting.
    It justfies the theme- Truth is Stranger than Fiction - as a reader i was looking forward to a Fictional Ending -where everything is Happy at the end.
    All the best for BAT.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Viyoma for acknowledging that it is not a fiction. And there for it is strange!

      Delete
  10. Sometimes its hard to digest the truth and that fact is justified from your writing. The climax part was very pleasing. Tnq for such a sustainable truth you expressed in climax..ATB for BAT 37...:):)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanx Vajra for appreciating the truth in the story. Yes, truth has its own ways.

      Delete
  11. if some more people have realized their mistakes at that time ,today's scenario would have changed,they incorporated corruption in them and bring it forward to the coming generations, very nice story

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Sifar for responding to the content of my write up. It is not a fictional story, it is based on a real happening.

      Delete
  12. Sir.. I have to give this one to you.. one of the best written posts which truly was focused on the BAT topic

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So very kind of you, Karan, to acknowledge the proximity of the BAT topic in my story. I thought that was what was expected of. Thanks.

      Delete
    2. Exactly.. but there are many others who use the phrase just for the sake of it.. so in that ways.. u nailed it

      Delete